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Conceptual Foundations 6th Edition Friberg Creasia Test Bank

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Conceptual Foundations 6th Edition Friberg Creasia Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-0323299930

ISBN-10: 0323299938

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Conceptual Foundations 6th Edition Friberg Creasia Test Bank

ISBN-13: 978-0323299930

ISBN-10: 0323299938

 

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Chapter 14: Diversity in Health and Illness

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. The nurse practicing in a diverse society can consider culture to be
a. a society or group that existed in a specific period of time.
b. a learned systems of beliefs, customs, language, and rituals.
c. practices or behaviors associated with specific racial groups.
d. transgenerational world views shared by diverse groups.

 

 

ANS:  B

The key element of culture is that it is learned. Culture encompasses many elements, including language, practices, habits, beliefs, rituals, and customs, all of which are socially inherited.

Cultures are historically defined by time period. For instance, the ancient Mayan people are considered a culture that existed in a specified period of time. But this definition is not relevant to a nurse practicing today.

Culture can include members who have different racial backgrounds.

There is a transgenerational element to culture, but diverse groups would not share their beliefs. Each group would have its own unique beliefs.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   256

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse is working with a third-generation Iraqi American and is frustrated that the patient continues to rely on folk healing practices and neglects to take prescribed medication. Another nurse explains that this most likely reflects
a. a lack of understanding on the patient’s part about treatment.
b. mistrust of the health system by members of this community.
c. poor language skills despite the patient’s third-generation status.
d. the effect of transgenerational transmission of cultural beliefs.

 

 

ANS:  D

Culture can transcend generations, which means that cultural beliefs can be transmitted from generation to generation, and this is a strong possible reason for the patient’s adherence to traditional Iraqi cultural practices.

A lack of understanding certainly could be a cause of not adhering to treatment for any patient, but the fact that the patient is from a different cultural group and is using folk practices should lead the nurses away from thinking this might be a primary cause.

Members of minority communities sometimes do have a lack of trust in the formalized health care system in this country. However, this group probably does not have a sentinel event that would lead them to mistrust the health care system en mass.

The patient is a third-generation American, which means his or her grandparents were the immigrants. Language skills should be good within this patient’s generational group, who were educated in American schools.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   256

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A patient has a serious illness but does not seem to be responding as the nurse expects. Which action by the nurse would most likely lead to a better understanding of this situation?
a. Ask the patient to describe what is wrong with him or her.
b. Determine whether any factors are interfering with learning.
c. Find out why the patient thinks the illness is not serious.
d. Inquire about cultural beliefs regarding health and illness.

 

 

ANS:  D

Culture has a huge impact on our understanding of what constitutes health and illness. The nurse should inquire into the meaning these constructs have for the patient in light of cultural variation.

Asking the patient to describe what is wrong is a good place to start, but the nurse should not limit the investigation of the situation to such a narrow perspective.

There might indeed be factors that are inhibiting the patient’s ability to learn information, but this approach is too narrow in focus and leaves out consideration of other influences.

The question does not state that the patient does not think the illness is serious; the question relates that the patient is responding in an unexpected way. This answer makes an assumption that has not been verified or even investigated.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse is caring for a female patient from an unfamiliar culture. The nurse has planned extensive discharge teaching, but the patient seems uninterested, deferring all questions to an older adult male relative. The best action by the nurse is to
a. ask the male relative to assist with discharge teaching.
b. include the male relative and revise the teaching plan.
c. remind the patient that her condition is confidential.
d. try to do the teaching when the male relative is absent.

 

 

ANS:  B

For many cultures, the nurse must recognize the importance of family (or others) in health care decision making and in health care behavior. The nurse should reconsider the discharge teaching plan and include the male relative in creating a new one. This demonstrates sensitivity by following the patient’s cultural cues.

The relative may not have the expertise or skill to actually assist with the teaching. Plus, without including him when planning the teaching, the patient has a high risk of not following through with the plan.

Confidentiality is an important concept in health care, but as nurses work with patients from increasingly diverse cultures, the implementation of confidentiality may need revision. This patient clearly wants her male relative included in her health care, and the nurse should follow the patient’s lead.

Trying to teach the patient when the relative is absent will most likely create a conflict between patient and nurse with the end result being “noncompliance” on the patient’s part. The nurse needs to follow the patient’s cultural cues and include the relative.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   TOP:   Nursing Process: Implementation

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse is caring for a patient whose culture emphasizes family commitment and involvement. The patient needs to learn and incorporate extensive lifestyle changes for heart-healthy living. Which action by the nurse would most likely lead to a successful outcome?
a. Ask family members if they would like to help the patient make the changes.
b. Choose a family spokesperson and involve that person in the patient’s teaching.
c. Encourage the family to check in on the patient to assess for his or her compliance.
d. Remind the patient that following the changes will lead to a longer life with his or her family.

 

 

ANS:  A

In some cultures, nursing care decisions are not considered solely the wishes of the patient (the American way) but must take into consideration the wishes and decisions of all family members. Because family commitment and involvement are strengths of the patient’s cultural group, the nurse should incorporate them into teaching and follow-up care for the patient.

Choosing a family spokesperson would work if there were a designated member of the cultural group to whom others defer. In this case, with the cultural strength being family involvement, the nurse would be wise to ask those people who are important to the patient if they would like to participate.

Encouraging the family to check in on the patient is a good intervention, involving many family members, but it is too narrow in focus to be the best answer.

Reminding the patient that following changes will lead to a longer life with family is a paternalistic statement and does not allow for involvement of the family, an identified cultural strength.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   TOP:   Nursing Process: Implementation

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. When working with Campinha-Bacote’s model of cultural competence, the nurse is aware that the most important concept inherent in the model is cultural
a. awareness.
b. desire.
c. encounters.
d. skill.

 

 

ANS:  B

Cultural desire provides the energy and foundation for the health care provider’s journey toward cultural competence. It is an internal motivator for the nurse and is probably the most important part of the model.

Cultural awareness is a concept in Campinha-Bacote’s model but is not the pivotal one.

Cultural encounters is a concept in the Campinha-Bacote model but is not the pivotal one.

Cultural skill is a concept in the Campinha-Bacote model but is not the pivotal one.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Remember            REF:   257                TOP:   Integrated Process: Caring

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse works with a diverse population. This nurse can conclude that care planning has been successful when
a. all patients meet the objectives set forth.
b. high levels of compliance are demonstrated.
c. patient care plans are culturally relevant.
d. patients understand what is expected of them.

 

 

ANS:  C

Care plans that are culturally relevant are vital for providing sensitive care to patients from diverse cultures.

Culturally relevant care is the prime goal when working with diverse patients. Just because all patients meet the outcomes set forth does not mean that this overarching goal was met.

Patients may be compliant for many different reasons, but this does not demonstrate culturally competent care.

Patients can understand expectations, but that does not mean they will follow through or find them important. A culturally competent care plan is one that is culturally relevant.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Evaluate                TOP:   Nursing Process: Evaluation

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A task force is meeting to determine the causes of dissatisfaction between a health care organization and members of a cultural group that receives care from the organization. The task force finds the nurses to be motivated to provide culturally sensitive care. Using the U.S. Health Resources Service Administration’s domains of cultural competence as a framework, what might the task force infer?
a. Nurses need more training to provide appropriate care to the group.
b. The organization presents barriers to culturally competent care.
c. There needs to be better communication between the two groups.
d. This cultural group is encountered infrequently by the organization.

 

 

ANS:  B

The U.S. Health Resources Service Administration’s critical domains of cultural competence include both individual and organizational factors. The nurses have taken the first step by being open and motivated. Now the organization needs to address domains pertaining to the organization itself so that the motivated nurses have the training and resources they need to provide culturally sensitive care.

Training and development is one of the nine critical domains of cultural competence, but lack of training is an organizational barrier. If there is one organizational barrier, there are probably more, which means this choice is too narrow in focus to be the best answer.

Better communication will always help when working with culturally diverse groups, but focusing solely on communication is not broad enough to consider the many factors that are hindering culturally competent care.

Nurses will never be experts on all cultures with whom they interact. Having personal and organizational resources that encourage culturally sensitive care provides the framework for working with any diverse culture.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analyze                TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A hospital nursing manager wishes to improve the cultural competence of the nurses working on the manager’s unit. Which action by the manager would best accomplish this goal for this particular unit?
a. Collect information about the cultures seen most often.
b. Ensure that written material is available in other languages.
c. Provide incentives to complete training programs.
d. Write policies and procedures for using interpreters.

 

 

ANS:  C

Education is a good way to start improving the nurses’ cultural competence, and this is something that can be done on a unit level. This option also addresses the broader topic of cultural competence itself rather than looking at very specific tasks. This is the process of cultural knowledge in the Campinha-Bacote model and can be considered training and development in the U.S. Health Resources Services Administration’s critical cultural domains model. The Office of Minority Health (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2007) has developed several excellent resources for health care providers, including a three-module training series on cultural competence called Culturally Competent Nursing Modules.

Although having resources about different cultural groups would be helpful, more work could be done on a broader scale.

Having written material in different languages is a valuable resource but does not help the nurses become more culturally competent.

Writing policies is usually done at the organizational level, not an individual unit level, unless the policy covers something very specific for that one unit. Additionally, using translators is a very narrow interpretation of cultural competence. This focuses on one single issue and does nothing to help the nurses advance in their ability to work with culturally diverse populations.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analyze                TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse is conducting a class for minority children who have juvenile diabetes. The class consists of teaching through game playing. The nurse is frustrated because the children do not seem engaged in the games, are hesitant to answer questions, and never want their prizes. The explanation by a colleague that would best clarify this situation is
a. “Diabetes is too complicated to teach by using games and prizes.”
b. “The kids may need some time to get used to your teaching style.”
c. “This culture might see group achievement as highly important.”
d. “Your prizes may not be culturally relevant for these children.”

 

 

ANS:  C

Americans place great value on individualism and value individual achievement over group achievement. Not all cultures have this value. Cultures that value group achievement and work would not place value on games and prizes, which focus on individual accomplishment. The nurse should consider that this minority group is uncomfortable with this teaching style, because it rewards individuals to the exclusion of the group.

Even complex material such as diabetic education should be amenable to fun, interactive teaching styles. This option also does not address the issue of culture.

It may be true that the children need more time to get used to the nurse’s teaching style, but this does not consider cultural influences for the behavior the nurse is seeing.

The nurse should assess whether the prizes are something children from this culture will find appealing, but this is not the most likely cause for their lack of interest because it would be unusual for all the prizes to simply be unappealing to all of the children. The explanation is most likely broader in nature.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analyze                TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. The nursing dean knows that in regard to minority and male nursing student enrollment,
a. male faculty numbers are approaching numbers similar to the overall male population.
b. male and minority enrollments have been growing exponentially.
c. minorities are well represented in nursing and health care today.
d. minority numbers have increased but still underrepresent the population.

 

 

ANS:  D

Minority enrollments into nursing school have been increasing, but these numbers are still not reflective of their numbers in the general population.

Males comprise only slightly more than 5% of faculty members

Minority enrollments have been growing but not at an exponential rate.

Minorities are underrepresented in health care today.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Remember            REF:   259

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nursing dean wants the admissions department to begin recruiting more heavily in culturally diverse communities and has applied for a grant to make this possible. Which statement by the dean best illustrates a compelling reason for this project? “Increased diversity
a. improves patient safety by reducing errors and misunderstandings.”
b. increases the chances that minority patients will trust and turn to us.”
c. provides more opportunities for nurses to improve their competence.”
d. will make health care more representative of the general population.”

 

 

ANS:  A

The lack of diversity in the educational experience of health care professionals and in the workforce has been linked to issues of quality and patient safety. Misunderstandings can arise from both language and different cultural values. Having a diverse population of nurses decreases the chances of this happening, which in turn improves patient safety.

Although it is true that more diversity in the nursing field may increase minority trust in nurses, this is not the most compelling reason for improving diversity. Patient safety comes first.

It is true that increased diversity provides more opportunities for nurses to improve their competence; however, this is not the most compelling reason for improving diversity. Patient safety is more important.

The goal of increased diversity in nursing is not simply to achieve a health care population that mirrors the general population; the driving reason is to increase cultural competency when working with patients from diverse backgrounds and improve safety and outcomes.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analyze

TOP:   Integrated Process: Communication and Documentation

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. The nurse studying diversity learns that the biggest problem with defining groups of people by racial labels is that
a. not everyone self-identifies as a member of a certain race.
b. races have been arbitrarily determined and are imprecise.
c. some people may see themselves as being multiracial.
d. the government cannot decide on permanent racial groups.

 

 

ANS:  B

Race designations seem to be based on sociopolitical constructs rather than on science, and definitions of races vary by culture. Definitions seem to have been arbitrarily determined and based mainly on physical characteristics.

It may be true that not everyone self-identifies as a member of a certain race; however, this is not the best answer because it may not affect a large number of people.

Some people do self-identify as biracial or multiracial, but this affects a minority of people in different races.

The government has determined that for federal purposes, there are five races and two ethnicities.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Remember            REF:   260

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse explains to a student that ethnicity may be more relevant to cultural diversity than race, because an ethnic group
a. contains people who are easily classified as group members.
b. has a common culture and history and a collective identity.
c. has members who are all from the same countries of origin.
d. may be easier to identify than race when physical traits differ.

 

 

ANS:  B

Ethnic groups have common origins, histories, and a collective identity despite the possibility that they come from different countries. Racial group members may come from widely variant backgrounds and share little or nothing in common.

Ethnic group membership may not be easily identified, especially if members come from different countries.

Ethnic group members can come from many nations.

Physical traits may differ among members of various races, but this does not explain why ethnicity is a more relevant construct than race.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   260

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse is working with a patient whose ethnic background emphasizes collective family decision making. The nurse needs to teach this patient self-care of diabetes, including how to take blood glucose readings and adjust insulin doses. The best action for the nurse to take in this situation is to
a. confirm the patient’s beliefs in this cultural value.
b. discuss the family’s wishes to be involved in care.
c. plan to include both patient and family in teaching.
d. wait for family to come before teaching the patient.

 

 

ANS:  A

Although knowledge about specific cultural beliefs is invaluable when working with patients from diverse cultures, the nurse should always confirm the patient’s beliefs and values with the patient.

Before discussing the family’s wishes, the nurse needs to know the patient’s wishes, which would involve clarifying the patient’s cultural values.

The nurse may well include both patient and family in the teaching, but this option assumes that both patient and family want to be involved and that the patient agrees to their involvement. It is better to clarify with the patient first.

Waiting for the family to come before beginning to teach the patient means the nurse has assumed what the patient and family want. The nurse should clarify the patient’s beliefs and values before going further.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nursing researcher explains to a class of nursing students that access to health care
a. among racial groups exhibits few, if any, lasting effects of discrimination.
b. differs significantly between minorities and white patients, even those with insurance.
c. differs tremendously within various regions and economic conditions.
d. is determined primarily by availability of quality health care insurance.

 

 

ANS:  B

Research has shown, that even among patients who have insurance, racial differences in a range of health care services exist.

The disparity in access to health care between whites and minorities demonstrates lasting effects of discrimination.

Research points to the availability of insurance and racial distinctions as being primary causative factors in health care disparities between whites and persons of color.

Health insurance is a major component of access to health care, but research continues to point out the disparities based on race.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   261

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A health care organization serves many patients from different racial and ethnic groups. One group in particular does not take advantage of specific programs offered. The nurse manager could infer that
a. members of this cultural group need further education on the program’s benefits.
b. the cultural group shares an experience that creates barriers to using the service.
c. the program simply is not equally beneficial to all cultural and racial groups.
d. these programs should be mainly marketed to groups that actually use them.

 

 

ANS:  B

Members of cultural groups share history, origins, values, and experiences. Something in the cultural group’s history or values may be hindering members’ use of services. The manager should enlist the help of community leaders to determine whether this is the case.

It may be true that members of this cultural group need further education on the program’s benefits; however, it would be wise of the manager to explore the culture with leaders from the community to see whether there are any cultural barriers to using the services before planning more education.

It may well be true that the program simply is not equally beneficial to all cultural and racial groups; however, the manager should determine the reason why the services are beneficial for specific groups and what could be done to increase their relevance and use.

If it is determined, after much investigation, that certain services are relevant only to specific groups, then marketing and education should be tailored to those groups. However, before deciding that this is the case, the manager needs to assess whether something in the specific cultural group is keeping members from using the programs and services.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Analyze                TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A faculty member explains that four states and Washington, DC are known as “majority-minority” areas, meaning
a. areas where the minority population is expected to become the majority.
b. non-white, non-Hispanic individuals make up the population majority.
c. places where the majority group alternates between white and nonwhite.
d. regions where there is no dominant population group to make a majority.

 

 

ANS:  B

In a majority-minority area, the total population of minorities (people other than single-race, non-Hispanic whites) make up the majority of the population.

An area where the minority population is expected to become the majority is not an example of a majority-minority.

A place where the majority group alternates between white and nonwhite does not fit the definition of “majority-minority.”

In a majority-minority area, there is a majority, it just does not fit the traditional pattern of being white, non-Hispanic.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   262

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A female patient from an unfamiliar culture is in the emergency department and needs an emergency operation. She wishes to wait for a tribal elder to arrive before making a decision about the operation. The best action by the nurse is to
a. ask the patient’s husband if he is willing to consent for the operation.
b. explain that only the patient may make health care decisions for herself.
c. prepare the patient for surgery under the doctrine of implied consent.
d. wait for the tribal elder to arrive and then obtain informed consent.

 

 

ANS:  D

The nurse who is providing culturally competent care recognizes that the patient has the right to include whomever she wants in the decision-making process and will wait. In some cultures, the individual’s desires are secondary to family or group wishes.

The culturally competent nurse would not breach a patient’s trust and ask someone whom the patient has not specifically designated to make this decision.

Culturally competent nurses realize they may need to expand their definitions of autonomy and family in order to facilitate decision making.

Preparing the patient for surgery before she chooses to go through with the operation would be paternalistic and disrespectful of the patient’s right to wait to make a decision.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   TOP:   Integrated Process: Caring

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse is planning a community teaching event on women’s health for members of an unfamiliar culture. To create an event that is successful, the best action by the nurse would be to
a. arrange the event at a location that is convenient to attend.
b. have activities for children who attend with their mothers.
c. plan to provide culturally appropriate food and beverages.
d. read about common health problems in this particular group.

 

 

ANS:  B

Arranging activities for small children would go a long way towards making the event successful. Mothers in some cultural groups take their children with them nearly everywhere; this is particularly true among lower income parents, who may not have options for babysitting. Small children can be disruptive and distract their parents, so having activities with which to engage them would be very helpful.

A convenient location is a beneficial asset, but it would not be the most important factor.

Culturally appropriate snacks are a great idea but would not be the most important consideration.

Being knowledgeable about common health problems for this group is important, but simply reading about them would not be the action most likely to result in a successful event.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   TOP:   Nursing Process: Implementation

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse is caring for a patient in the hospital who is from an unfamiliar culture. Which question by the nurse would provide the most beneficial information?
a. “How can I assist you to learn self-care?”
b. “What do you expect out of health care?”
c. “What role does your family play in illness?”
d. “Why do you think you have gotten sick?”

 

 

ANS:  B

Understanding the patient’s expectations for his or her health care experience would be vital in creating a plan of care that meets the patient’s needs. From this foundation, the nurse can plan activities to address both health care and cultural needs.

Asking how the nurse can assist in self-care assumes the patient needs and wants to be active in self-care.

Asking about the role of the family in illness is too narrow a question.

Understanding the patient’s view of the cause of illness is an important concept, but it would not be the most important question to ask.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Apply                   TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. A nurse is frustrated working with a patient who is from another culture. The patient does not seem to be motivated to learn to provide self-care. A more experienced nurse helps interpret this behavior by stating,
a. “Everyone has motivators; you have to find your patient’s.”
b. “It’s possible the patient doesn’t understand what to do yet.”
c. “The patient’s culture may include a dependent sick role.”
d. “Your patient is not ready to learn about self-care yet.”

 

 

ANS:  C

Some cultures include a dependent sick role, and patients from such a culture would consider an instruction to perform self-care as inappropriate. The nurse would be well advised to assess the patient’s cultural beliefs regarding health and wellness first.

It is easier to effect change when the nurse can tie the need for change to a motivating factor in the patient’s life. However, this answer does not account for cultural diversity.

The patient may well be confused or unsure of what to do, but this answer does not account for cultural diversity.

The patient may not be emotionally or physically ready to learn self-care measures, but this option does not account for cultural diversity.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   256

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. An experienced nurse explains to a newly hired nurse that understanding other cultures’ worldviews is important in helping individuals meet health care goals, because
a. culture is an important concept in health and illness.
b. every culture has its own related values and attitudes.
c. people may be afraid of others with differing views.
d. people’s worldviews influence their perception of health care.

 

 

ANS:  D

The process of cultural knowledge occurs when nurses educate themselves about the worldviews of other cultures and ethnic groups. Cultural worldviews influence patients’ perceptions of health care and their role and expectations. Knowing this allows the nurse to assess and then plan for care that is culturally relevant.

Culture is an important concept in health and illness, but this answer is not specific enough to be the best answer.

It is true that every culture has its own related values and attitudes, but this is not specific enough to be the best answer.

People are sometimes afraid of others who seem different to them, but this is not the best answer, because it does not explain the effect of worldviews.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Understand            REF:   257

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

MULTIPLE RESPONSE

 

  1. The nursing student knows that Leininger’s theory of cultural care includes cultural (Select all that apply.)
a. care accommodation/negotiation.
b. care repatterning/restructuring.
c. compromise/confrontation.
d. preservation/maintenance.
e. reeducation/recreating.

 

 

ANS:  A, B, D

Cultural care accommodation/negotiation is part of Leininger’s theory.

Cultural care repatterning/restructuring is part of Leininger’s theory.

Cultural preservation/maintenance is part of Leininger’s theory.

Cultural compromise/confrontation is not part of Leininger’s theory.

Cultural reeducation/recreating is also not part of Leininger’s theory.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Remember            REF:   257

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. The nurse working with diverse populations understands that values of American culture that may be at odds with those from other cultures include (Select all that apply.)
a. androcentrism.
b. autonomy.
c. collective decision making.
d. individual achievement.
e. personal freedom.

 

 

ANS:  A, B, D, E

Androcentrism is the practice of placing the male point of view at the center of the culture and its worldview. U.S. culture tends to be androcentric in nature, which would put it at odds with gynocentric (woman-focused) cultures or cultures in which equal value is placed on both male and female outlooks.

Autonomy is a predominantly Western viewpoint and is an important concept in American culture. This would be at odds with cultures in which more importance is placed on family units or social groups, cultures in which decision making requires considering those groups as the priority.

Westerners—Americans in particular—place high value on individual achievement. This could cause conflict in a culture that values collective work and accomplishment.

Personal freedom is valued highly in American culture and could conflict with cultures that emphasize group harmony over personal freedom.

Collective decision making is not a predominant American cultural value.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Remember            REF:   258 | 259

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. The nurse working in a diverse community works to address discrepancies in health care, which include (Select all that apply.)
a. employer-provided insurance.
b. institutionalized racism.
c. resentment of lack of access.
d. social realities of different groups.
e. the drive to be “color blind.”

 

 

ANS:  A, B, D, E

Many social factors exist that affect access to and delivery of health care, including the provision or lack of employer-provided insurance, institutionalized racism, differing social realities of cultural groups, and the drive to be “color blind.”

Resentment felt by members of cultural groups over discrepancies in health care access and delivery does not cause the discrepancies.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Remember            REF:   262                TOP:   Integrated Process: Caring

MSC:  NCLEX Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity